Discrimination

You will always know that which is spiritual from that which is not, that which is of the light from that which is of darkness, and how will you know? … See what brings light in your mind and in your heart so that you shed the darkness and the limitation and go “Ah, it is a beautiful world. I am a beautiful being, and all those I see before me, they are expressions of God herself.  They are great, each and every one, and I love them all.”  What brings these feelings in the mind, that is positive.  Go towards it, enhance it, stay near it.

— P.R. Sarkar

Walk in beauty

May you walk in Beauty in a sacred way
May you walk in Beauty each and every day.

May you walk in Beauty in a sacred way
May you walk in Beauty each and every day.

May the Beauty of the Fire, lift your spirit higher,
May the Beauty of the Earth, fill your heart with mirth,
May the Beauty of the Rain, wash away your pain,
May the beauty of the Sky teach your mind to fly.

Wise Democracy

“You probably love real democracy wherever you can find it, as do we. And like us, you also probably believe it still needs a lot of work. So we imagine you appreciating a resource that will help people everywhere envision and co-create a deeply participatory culture that supports a thriving and healthy world long into the future.

So I’m happy to announce that the Co-Intelligence Institute is today launching a substantial (yet built to evolve) database of wise democracy guidelines, real-life examples, and accessible resources to help us all understand, re-imagine and transform the ways we co-create our shared world.

You can be one of the first to see and use this novel resource. And as you explore its tropical beauty and richness – and delve into the pattern language that underlies it – you may choose to become one of its ongoing co-creators, sharing insights and experiences that evolve it into an ever-more-powerful participatory tool to wisely address the challenges ahead”

http://www.wd-pl.com/

Way Of The Heart

A friend sent me a link to the following article, which mentions the synchronization of heartbeats among choir members.

http://upliftconnect.com/neuroscience-of-singing/

This reminds me of two songs:

One World One Heart Beating by Oona McOuat in 2012: “We are one world, one voice, one heart beating.”

https://oneworldoneheartbeating.com/lyrics/

Way of the Heart by Ruparahi in 1983: “All hearts are beating as one.”

http://www.sannyas.wiki/index.php?title=The_Way_of_the_Heart_%28music_track%29

Tree of Life by Rob Tobias

 

Breathe in, breathe out, breathe in.

Breathe out, breathe in, breathe out.

Eitz Chaim, Tree of Life, Eitz Chaim.

Eitz Chaim, Tree of Life, Eitz Chaim.

What the tree breathes in, i breathe out.

What i breathe out, the tree breathes in.

Eitz Chaim, Tree of Life, Eitz Chaim.

Eitz Chaim, Tree of Life, Eitz Chaim.

And i reach and turn, i teach and i learn.

I’m reaching for the highest friends i see.

Yes i reach and i turn, i teach and i learn.

I’m reaching for the friends who love that tree.

What the tree breathes in, i breathe out.

What i breathe out, the tree breathes in.

Eitz Chaim, Tree of Life, Eitz Chaim.

Eitz Chaim, Tree of Life, Eitz Chaim.

And i reach and turn, i teach and i learn.

I’m reaching for the highest friends i see.

Yes i reach and i turn, i teach and i learn.

I’m reaching for the friends who love that tree.

Breathe in, breathe out, breathe in.

Breathe out, breathe in, breathe out.

Camazotz on Earth

Fordlandia: The Failure Of Ford’s Jungle Utopia

June 6, 2009, 2:50 PM ET

Henry Ford didn’t just want to be a maker of cars — he wanted to be a maker of men. He thought he could perfect society by building model factories and pristine villages to go with them. And he was pretty successful at it in Michigan. But in the jungles of Brazil, he would ultimately be defeated.

It was 1927. Ford wanted his own supply of rubber — and he decided to get it by carving a plantation and a miniature Midwest factory town out of the Amazon jungle. It was called “Fordlandia.”

Leonor Weeks DeCeco was 8 years old when she joined her father in Henry Ford’s jungle utopia. “We had everything that we really wanted. We had a swimming pool, tennis court, golf course, and I had my animals — my Chico, which was a rare monkey.”

“My dad was a construction engineer, and he was in charge of everything, and I enjoyed being down there with him,” she says.

But for pretty much everyone else, it was a green hell of riot and blight. Author Greg Grandin tells the story in his new book, Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City.

The project didn’t start out well, Grandin says. There was a huge clash of culture between mechanized America, Ford’s utopian ideals and the way the indigenous people lived.

The first failure of Fordlandia was social. “The first years of the settlement were plagued by waste and violence and vice,” Grandin says.

“There were knife fights, there were riots over food and attempts to impose Ford-style regimentation,” Grandin says. “When people ask me what Fordlandia was like, I tell them to think more of Deadwood than Our Town.”

Things went bad over simple stuff, like serving food. “Ford had very particular understandings about what a proper diet should be,” Grandin says. “He tried to impose brown rice and whole-wheat bread and canned peaches and oatmeal — and that itself created discontent.”

But when a Ford engineer changed the way food was served — from wait service to cafeteria-style service — the workers rebelled. Angry workers destroyed the mess hall, pushed trucks into the river and nearly ruined the whole operation. It cost tens of thousands of dollars of damage, Grandin says.

But Ford didn’t just want to tame men; he wanted to tame the jungle itself — and therein was his next failure.

“Ford basically tried to impose mass industrial production on the diversity of the jungle,” Grandin says. But the Amazon is one of the most complex ecological systems in the world — and didn’t fit into Ford’s plan. “Nowhere was this more obvious and more acute than when it came to rubber production,” Grandin says.

Ford was so distrustful of experts that he never even consulted one about rubber trees. If he had, Grandin says, he would have learned that plantation rubber can’t be grown in the Amazon. “The pests and the fungi and the blight that feed off of rubber are native to the Amazon. Basically, when you put trees close together in the Amazon, what you in effect do is create an incubator — but Ford insisted.”

The resulting plantation actually accelerated the production of caterpillars, leaf blight and other organisms that prey on rubber, Grandin says.

Even when not worried about riots or leaf blight, the people running the plantation — brought down from Michigan — had a hard time in the rainforest.

“They succumbed to the heat, the oppressive humidity,” Grandin says. “Wives who accompanied the men down to Fordlandia had less to do. Men, at least, were charged with trying to build the town, trying to build a plantation.”

Fordlandia isn’t just the story of a plantation; it’s a story about Ford’s ego. As disaster after disaster struck, Ford continued to pour money into the project. Not one drop of latex from Fordlandia ever made it into a Ford car.

But the more it failed, the more Ford justified the project in idealistic terms. “It increasingly was justified as a work of civilization, or as a sociological experiment,” Grandin says. One newspaper article even reported that Ford’s intent wasn’t just to cultivate rubber, but to cultivate workers and human beings.

In the end, Ford’s utopia failed. Fordlandia’s residents, ever in hope their patriarch would someday visit their Midwestern industrial town in the middle of the jungle, gave up and left.

These days, Fordlandia is quite beautiful, Grandin says. The “American” town where the managers and administrators lived is abandoned and overgrown. Weeds grow over the American-style bungalows, and bats roost in the rafters, and little red fire hydrants sit covered in vines.

From: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=105068620

Peaceful Conflict Resolution

An article i saved from http://ahymsin.org/ on February 28, 2016.

Peaceful Conflict Resolution

by Daniel Hertz

The practice of Yoga and Meditation allows us to learn and develop very useful relaxation and breathing skills. These skills facilitate the movement toward more inner awareness. When these same skills are applied to the external world, they can become valuable tools in helping others find peaceful solutions to conflicts. Mediation is a gentle approach for disputing parties to come together and discuss and resolve their differences. The most difficult and challenging problems can be resolved if each disputing party can slow their breathing, relax their shoulders, and let go of any tension in the forehead. As the Dalai Lama has said, “Peace does not mean an absence of conflicts; differences will always be there. Peace means solving these differences through peaceful means.”

Many people are naturally very good at finding a way to resolve conflicts peacefully.  But this skill of conflict resolution is also something that can be taught. Recently I was asked to train a group of students, 18-21 years old, in peer mediation.  It is in a school for new immigrants in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Students from many different countries come together to form a school community.  Usually the incidence of behavior problems is very low.  Most of the students are there to make the most of the learning opportunity.  But occasionally the wrong mix of students gets caught up in a divisive way of thinking. This can result in conflicts between the different language groups that causes hostility and even violence.  The students need to be shown a method to resolve their conflicts peacefully.  I have witnessed many times that peer mediation skills can be taught to people of all ages and backgrounds.

A conflict between two people can either escalate or de-escalate. This depends on the reaction of each person involved in the dispute.  If someone directs their anger toward you and you respond with anger, the situation will escalate.   If you react to anger with a calm, caring, and compassionate tone, the situation will de-escalate.  This is always easier said than done, but it is possible.  Often our first instinct is to respond with anger when someone gets angry at you.  But we can learn from practicing Meditation that the reaction we have is a choice.  This choice does not have to be a reflection of what is coming at you.  It can be a reflection of what is inside of you.  We can also learn from Meditation that it is possible to detach, even just a little bit, from the hold that a strong emotion has on you.

Through experience I have learned that it is not possible to resolve a problem when both parties are at the peak of their anger.  It may be necessary to wait for a few hours or until the next day to begin a mediation.  Relaxation and breathing exercises can help speed up the process of coming down from the anger mountain. If the two disputants cannot resolve the problem on their own, it may take a 3rd party to mediate the situation. Someone who can remain calm, relaxed, and neutral in the midst of angry people can learn to become a great mediator. The practice of Yoga and Meditation gives us these skills.


Daniel Hertz (E-RYT 500) is an award winning teacher and counselor in the Minneapolis Public Schools and is on the faculty of The Meditation Center. He is the author of two Yoga-Meditation related books that benefit SRIVERM, the school in the remote Himalayas founded by Swami Hari.  Please see http://DanielHertzBooks.wordpress.com/  for more information.